Category: Business

24 Oct 2018
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Mobile Payment Systems: Expectations vs. Reality

New payment systems are emerging all the time it seems like. But are they really an asset to a business like yours?

To help guide you, I’ve compiled four common misconceptions that business owners hold about mobile payment systems.

You’ll learn why these systems work, and why you should be taking a much closer look at them in the coming years.

Misconception #1: Mobile Payments Aren’t Secure

Expectation: Many newcomers to mobile payments believe that since the process involves a phone, it’s inherently hard to secure.

They think that too much personal information is at stake and that mobile payments are easy to hack and compromise.

Reality: Modern technology is well aware of the risks, and has developed processes to help keep both buyer and seller secure.

For example, a process called tokenization is a standard security feature in mobile payments. It creates a unique encryption per transaction that’s only used once.

Hacking or replicating it is nearly impossible.

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(Image Source)

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Throw on the fact that mobile payment operators and modern POS systems have to stay PCI compliant, and you begin to see how secure mobile payment systems really are.

Misconception #2: Accepting Mobile Payments is Complicated

Expectations: Another common misconception is that mobile payments will make life difficult for both the business and the consumer. The fear is that you would need either:

  1. A dedicated team of IT professionals on staff, or
  2. A detailed knowledge of payment systems yourself

But neither of these is the case.  

Reality: Mobile payment systems are surprisingly simple to set up and use for all parties involved. Unless you plan on building your own payment system, the process is simple.

Recent statistics show that 64% of Americans have used mobile payment in a transaction this year:

mobile payment stats

(Image Source)

So not only do your customers use mobile payments, they want to use them in your business.

Many mobile payment systems are incredibly intuitive and user-friendly and will work alongside your current POS. It may require your customer to download an app, but the payoff is worth it.

Misconception #3: Mobile Payment Options Don’t Help Sales

Expectation: It’s easy to fear the impact that new technologies might have on your bottom line. If you go all-in on a new payment system, will your customers respond positively or negatively?

The uncertainty is more than enough to keep many business owners from pulling the trigger, especially if your operation is purely brick-and-mortar.

Reality: As we’ve already seen, mobile payment system use is already incredibly popular. This isn’t necessarily new technology anymore.

But more importantly, it has been shown to help your bottom line. In 2016 alone, more than $60 billion in sales was through mobile payment.

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(Image Source)

And by 2020, it’s estimated that in-store mobile payments will exceed $500 billion.

The opportunity is certainly already present, and this can be a way that many businesses differentiate themselves from the competition.

Misconception #4: Enabling Mobile Payments is Expensive

Expectation: The final misconception amongst business owners is that mobile payment systems are too expensive. Since they’re already paying high fees on credit cards and their POS, why add another burden?

Reality: Many businesses have found that adopting a mobile-friendly payment option is helping them cut costs in the long run.

In fact, they often help eliminate credit card fees, and as we’ve already seen can help you increase your income as adoption grows.

Conclusion

Whatever your perception of mobile payment systems is, there’s one thing that’s clear:

They’re the future.

If you’re on the fence about setting one up for your business, my recommendation is to start with a simple price analysis.

You can learn more about how mobile payment can help your business grow and then make your move.

 

18 Sep 2015
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What Makes A Financial Website Successful?

At one time, the internet appeared to offer all organisations a simple proposition: email connectivity and a clickable presence in the form of a website. Today, web presence has rapidly evolved with interactive content and the ability to deliver transactional experiences – or e-commerce. Migrating services online helps business reduce costs, while customers benefit from the convenience and autonomy of self-service.

Financial services are faced with the challenge of delivering their customers with an online experience that goes far beyond just a website.

Financial services sites are absolutely competitive. They are really trying to drive people online. The self-service model is being taken seriously so they want to make sure their sites are available, responsive and allow users to do as many things as possible.

Though, many have shown an overall poor performance. The top reasons for failure were as follows: company websites make browsing too difficult; content missing, repeated and

poorly worded; and site search doesn’t work for typical tasks.

Here are three factors for a successful online financial service site which keeps users engaged and displays great use of technology while still delivers company’s messages clearly and effectively:

  • Customer experience, which includes the impression the homepage and overall design style give the customers, their satisfaction when they interact with the site and perform tasks.
  • Best practices, such as ease of use, quality, availability and security – site managers must be compliant with data laws requiring them to protect customer information and the integrity of customer accounts.
  • Service-level, which looks at responsiveness and reliability of websites – scores them on how quickly they respond to user commands and such factors as average downtime.

Financial services must tie these three factors together – customer experience, best practices and reliability/responsiveness – to have an effective web presence. They can’t go hard into one particular area and ignore the others. They have to understand what’s available versus their competitors, what consumers think of their sites versus competitors’ and how their sites are performing.

09 Sep 2015
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How To Choose The Best Theme For My Business?

Building a beautiful website for your business begins with choosing a theme — a design that controls page layout, widget areas, and default style. Selecting Polygon for your business website can feel overwhelming, but you can make it easier by focusing on these three questions.

What Am I Publishing on My Website?
Draft a visual map of your website to help you plan your site structure and decide what you want your homepage to look like. Will your homepage contain static information about your business like a welcome message and business hours or do you want to showcase your latest blog content?

What Features Do I Need?
Are you building a restaurant website, a landing page for your hotel, a corporate blog, or something completely different? Depending on your business, you may need website features exclusive to certain themes.

What Look and Feel Do I Want for My Website?
You can filter themes by style and color if you have a specific look in mind or need to match a brand logo. While most themes can be tweaked with custom headers and background colors, Custom Design unlocks next-level customization.

Think back to the content you expect to publish on your site. Do you need a design that showcases photos? If so, choose a portfolio site or a design that makes the most of high-resolution photos. Perhaps photography plays a small role in your website design. If so, avoid themes that only look good with a lot of photos.

09 Sep 2015
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Daily Inspiration

On autumn weekends with good weather you can almost experience caravans of people marching over the grandiose lookout balconies between the Dolomites and the Tauern and filling the mountain lodges to capacity. But very few people have the idea of turning the perspective around and approaching the Carnic ridge for once from the valley side. And that is something that is certainly worthwhile.
It is no coincidence that at Heinfels in the valley of Drau, which is called Pustertal here, there stands an ancient castle that still appears to be fortified. It guards the entrance to two valleys: the Villgratental and the Tyrolean Gailtal. The latter is quite hidden, as it begins with a terrain level high above the valley floor of the river Drau. There is a climb of several hundred metres on a serpentine road before reaching the community of Kartitsch, with the prettily shaped tower of the St. Leonhard parish church. From the enclosure wall of the cemetery you can enjoy a distant view to the west into the Pustertal, which here runs in a strikingly straight line. The reason for this is a distinct geological line, the “peri-adriatic seam“. This frontier line leaves the Pustertal in Kartitsch and follows the Tyrolean Gailtal, which to the east of the Kartitscher Sattel is called the Tilliacher Tal, and then further east beyond the federal border with Carinthia again changes its name, and for the next 20 kilometres goes under the name of Lesachtal. At Kötschach-Mauthen the name of the valley changes again, confusingly back to Gailtal, which at Villach at last flows into the Drau.
Viewed from above, the Gail or Lesachtal also runs in a straight line. There is a clear distinction in appearance between the northern and southern sides of the valley. N ons side the gentle foothills of the Lienzer Dolomites, with its wide alp areas, on the other side the rocky contours of the Carnic ridge towering above thick mountain forest and marking the state border with Italy.
In Kartitsch we are already 1.350 m above sea level, the area is one of the highest situated valleys in East Tyrol, which itself is at high altitude.
Some 200 m higher the Kartitscher Sattel is reached, from where you can look down onto Obertilliach and Untertilliach.
“Golzentipp“ is the name of the local mountain in this area. A perfect vantage point with a grandiose panorama view, encompassing the Hohen Tauern and the Schober group of mountains, the Lienzer Dolomites, the Carnic Alps, the Sextener Dolomites and far into the Pustertal. The chances are good that the view can also be enjoyed, as testified by the many years of meteorological records taken in this region, showing an above-average number of sunny days.
Fans of high rocky cliffs will prefer the south side of the valley and head for one of the many side valleys of the Carnic ridge. Pfannspitze, Großer Kinigat, Porze, Cima Manzon, Gamskofel, Hochspitz, Steinkarspitz – between the Obstanser See and the Luggauer Scharte there are countless opportunities to test your stamina and alpine abilities in the midst of grandiose mountain scenery.
[From mountainvillages.at]

21 Aug 2015
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Video

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way.

A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradise matic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. When she reached the first hills of the Italic Mountains, she had a last view back on the skyline of her hometown Bookmarksgrove, the headline of Alphabet Village and the subline of her own road.

21 Aug 2015
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Gallery

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way.

A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradise matic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar. The Big Oxmox advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way. When she reached the first hills of the Italic Mountains, she had a last view back on the skyline of her hometown Bookmarksgrove, the headline of Alphabet Village and the subline of her own road.